Posts by: johneinarsen

Unbridled Perception

On September 13, 2016 By

The founders of the Miksang Institute for Contemplative Photography bring their practice to Asia with a pioneering workshop in Japan.

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Holding the Ashen Bark

On July 28, 2016 By

“Why do we come to this place, to Hiroshima?” President Obama asked himself and the world in his historic speech on May 27th, 2016. I too, ask myself why I’ve been to Hiroshima over and over, and why I took the chance to witness this historic visit by the sitting US president.

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A Miksang Contemplative Photography Workshop will be held for the first time in Asia from May 4th-15th, 2016 in Kyoto. Find out more here….

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Short Shorts

On December 10, 2015 By

WRITERS IN KYOTO PRESENTS THE FIRST
ANNUAL KYOTO WRITING COMPETITION

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[Love of rocks and gardens is what lured me to Japan. During an extended visit I photographed gardens in Kyoto every day for a year…

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The basic and ongoing challenge to any democracy is that its citizens need to have free and open access to unbiased information. They must further be presented with alternative domestic viewpoints and varying historical narratives as well as being engaged in critical dialogue with the larger world beyond

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Partitioned Views

On September 15, 2015 By

Kyoto, described by photographer Ben Simmons in Kyoto Gardens as, “a unique treasure of concentrated beauty and spirit found nowhere else,” is a good place to start an exploration of the Japanese garden.

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    Tibetan Butter Tea and Pink Gin: Life in Old Darjeeling   Extended version from KJ 83 by ANN TASHI SLATER   n November 30, 2004, the Himalayan moon setting over Darjeeling town and the snowy peaks of the Kanchenjunga range, my Tibetan grandmother died. According to the Western calendar, she was four months […]

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The Garden View

On September 3, 2015 By

“My idea was to create photographs that explore this undefined border between private and public space by photographing the garden from deep inside the temple, balancing the areas of the tatami/ meditation space and the garden space equally in the image.”

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