Posts by: johneinarsen

KJ 83: FOOD!

On July 7, 2015 By

FOOD!—a delectable feast of articles, essays, interviews, poetry, and fine photography, painstakingly prepared by our all-volunteer international kitchen crew—will be released on August 1st, 2015

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Teresa Mei Chuc reads her poetry. From Remembering Viet Nam, KJ 82

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ew York-based, principle portrait and environmental photographer Michael Magers first came to Japan to work on an upcoming book on Japanese food and culture written by Matt Goulding and published by Ecco, Anthony Bourdain’s imprint at Harper Collins. For that project he went to photograph the knife makers of Sakai, his first introduction to […]

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APRIL 18-MAY10: Fourteen exhibitions on the theme of “TRIBE,” spread across Kyoto in brilliantly-coordinated venues ranging from a sub-temple of the city’s first Zen monastery to traditional inner-city machiya to a temporary Shigeru Ban cardboard-columned pavilion in front of City Hall to “anti-fashionista” Rei Kawakubo’s local Comme Des Garcons concept store.

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Our theme will be “Tribe,” but not in an ethnic sense—it’s more in the sense of a community that shares the same sense of values.

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Off the Wall

On March 18, 2015 By

“Usually my pieces grow from a bird or an idea, sometimes an endangered species that has some story around it, like fragmentation of habitat….”

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AMIKO MATSUO

The Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale in the mountainous Niigata region of Japan has become a model, yet an underappreciated one, for expansive social art practices.

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Japan, the U.S. and ISIS

On March 16, 2015 By

The roots of animosity towards Japan go back at least a decade, to 2004, when in a gesture of support for U.S.-led operations in Iraq, Japan deployed armed Self-Defense Force (SDF) personnel for the first time since World War II.

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Manshin is a title of respect identifying a mudang, a female Korean shaman. For centuries manshin had been openly persecuted, their practices disrupted and shrines destroyed, their artistry desecrated to entertainment. The prevailing religious and social order forced the practice of shamanism “underground”. That one of Korea’s most acclaimed artists became a mudang has had impact in Korea as well as globally.

BY Lauren W. Deutsch, Contributing Editor

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