Culture

For over a thousand years, as the imperial capital, Kyoto was the arbiter of Japanese culture and its finest arts. Today, it is still revered for both traditional and contemporary excellence. KJ has a deep interest in the place of the arts, and literature, in present-day society, all across Asia and beyond. Contact: submissions@kyotojournal.org  
 

Culture

On June 15, 2011 By

Culture For over a thousand years, as the imperial capital, Kyoto was the arbiter of Japanese culture and its finest arts. Today, it is still revered for both traditional and contemporary excellence. KJ has a deep interest in the place of the arts, and literature, in present-day society, all across Asia and beyond. Contact: submissions@kyotojournal.org […]

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Nature and Culture in Japan

On November 30, 2011 By

VALUES
BY ALLAN G. GRAPARD

Japanese cultural tradition hides a vast storehouse of notions and practices that may be helpful in establishing a culturally-grounded eco-philosophy…

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The Hollow Staff

On November 14, 2011 By

MUSIC
BY PAUL RODRIGUEZ (SILK ROADS)

The Silk Road would have been full of musicians…musicians from a dozen distinct traditions traveling in the same caravans, meeting around the same fires. What did they say to one another when they met…?

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Geisha Tradition

On November 13, 2011 By

FILM
REVIEW BY SALLY McLAREN

Hannari — Geisha Modern is a documentary film about the lives and arts of geisha in contemporary Kyoto filmed from the perspective of a Japanese woman.

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Metabolic Syndrome

On November 13, 2011 By

ARCHITECTURE
REVIEW BY SUSAN PAVLOSKA

These lucid essays discuss Japanese architecture in the aftermath of the Bubble.

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Language goes Two Ways

On November 5, 2011 By

WORD
BY GARY SNYDER

Language goes two ways: it enables us to have a small window onto an independently existing world, but it also shapes — via its very structures and vocabularies — how we see that world.

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MUSIC
As told by DAVID GREER

After Toako showed her how to decipher the squiggles on the scores, Fujiko was enchanted with the magic she could conjure, but she soon shriveled under her mother’s blistering criticism and the relentless repetition…

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Framing China

On October 23, 2011 By

MEDIA
BY JAMES MANN

In the 1950s and the 1960s, the “frame” was of China as little blue ants or automatons. In the 1970s, following the Nixon administration’s opening, the frame was of the virtuous (entertaining, cute) Chinese…. In the 1980s, the frame was that China was “going capitalist.”

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MEDIA
BY ERIC JOHNSTON

The Holy Terror from Baltimore had never set foot in Japan. But he understood instinctively that news from war-torn China often crossed the line into anti-Japanese propaganda…

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“The Myth of Tomorrow”

On October 19, 2011 By

ART
BY DONALD C. WOOD & AKIKO TAKAHASHI

“Myth of Tomorrow” represents the culmination of Okamoto Tarō’s concern over the horrors of war and the fear of atomic weapons.

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