Kyoto Notebook

While our masthead promises “Perspectives from Asia,” our heart is here in this marvelous city that forms the foundation for KJ’s interconnected vision. What’s going on here in old Kyoto? Perspectives from Kyoto…
 
 

 
The obvious antiquity of elements of Kyoto makes the city something like a time machine. However, that is only part of the attraction. More important, perhaps, is the fact that Kyoto’s antiquity continues to be renewed — through daily raking of the sand at Ryoan-ji, refurbishing of the platform at Kiyomizu-dera, or even the natural renewal of the foliage on Higashiyama — all “living” reminders of Kyoto’s past. Even in the Edo period, people from all over Japan traveled to Kyoto to see the famous sites. Because so little in the basic structure of the city has changed, an Edo period traveler, transported in time to prsent day Kyoto would have little trouble finding his way about the city. The bright lights of pachinko parlors would no doubt be fascinating to such a time traveler. He would probably even find the Kyoto meisho-zue, an eighteenth century guidebook, still useful. How untrue this statement would be applied to Tokyo or Osaka.
—George Hlawatsch, KJ 27
 


40. Inaugurate an annual competition and prize for best project of the year integrating new technology and Kyoto tradition - architecture, landscaping, social program, craftwork, art....

 

 

The Machiya Machizukuri Fund

promotes machiya preservation

 

HUB Kyoto

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Kyoto Notebook

On June 15, 2011 By

Kyoto Notebook

While our masthead promises “Perspectives from Asia,” our heart is here in this marvelous city that forms the foundation for KJ’s interconnected vision. What’s going on here in old Kyoto? Perspectives from Kyoto…
 
 

 
he obvious antiquity of elements of Kyoto makes the city something like a time […]

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Spiritual Journey

On October 7, 2011 By

BY BARRY JAMES LECKENBY

Australian-born Buddhist poet Harold Stewart lived in Kyoto for twenty-nine years, and in 1995 his ashes were scattered near the Shonin-in on Higashiyama…

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In the Eternal Now

On October 2, 2011 By

BY KEN RODGERS

Overlooking Kyoto from his sacred mountain — one hand shading his eyes against the southern sun — the Bishamonten of Kurama has seen it all. Purple dawns, golden sunsets, the habitual arcs of moon and planets, seasons of rice-plantings, harvests, fire festivals…

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The Open Homeless

On July 5, 2011 By

INTERVIEW BY JOHN EINARSEN

Over the past eight years, Ryuta and Chieko Kobayashi have resided in shelters made of cardboard and wood, crafted with their own hands, under the Kojinguchi Bridge on the Kamo River…

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Behind the Brocade Curtain

On June 24, 2011 By

FESTIVAL
BY CATHERINE PAWASARAT

One day I literally stumbled upon the festival’s gigantic floats, some as high as downtown buildings, and marveled at their exquisite adornments of exotic textiles and carvings. I didn’t know what I was looking at, but it blew my mind.

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1970s Kyoto

On April 17, 2011 By

BY ALAN CHONG LAU

The boarding house throbs with the constant shuttle of looms obeying their masters. Even in the owner’s living room, his grandmother and I face a wall filled with an assortment of colored threads neatly stored in coils…

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Watch the White of the Sky

On April 17, 2011 By

FILM
BY PIA LAMERIN

“I told him, go, look at the temples, the old houses around Kyoto. Go at different times of the day, different seasons…Look at the gardens, the old walls. Do you know how many different kinds of walls there are in this town?

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Guardians of Poets’ Mount

On April 15, 2011 By

POETRY
BY LUCINDA COWING

“I thought it was outrageous,” he explains, “to have a mountain in such a culturally-significant position — next to the famed Mount Arashiyama, with the Hozu River flowing down one side and the historical village of Saga on the other — so defiled.”

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The Path to Honen-in

On April 15, 2011 By

BY JOHN DOUGILL

For a man who wears so many caps, the shaven-headed priest exudes a genial calm. He talks openly and from the heart; here is none of the closed manner for which Kyoto is famous.

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