Online Special

Our new website opens up exciting possibilities through the immediacy and expanding potential of digital publishing and multimedia. In addition to posting topical articles as online-only special features, we bring you out-of-the-ordinary videos and occasional podcasts. Our most recent postings appear on this page. For your easy reference, here’s a list that illustrates the variety of what we offer.

Step Inside the World of Noh

Exiled: A Tibetan in Kyoto

The Engaged Buddhism of Sulak Sivaraksa

Donald Richie on Buddhism and the Film

The Kids are Too Straight

Development, Identity and the Destruction of an Ancient City in Afghanistan

Fukushima’s Children

An Atmosphere of Concern:
My Summer as an Intern in the
Climate Change Group

Ghost Town: Myanmar’s New Capital

Mayumi Oda on Energy of Change, Feminization and New Birth of Japan

Zen & the Art of Rejuvenation

In Praise of Clay

The Guardians of Poet’s Mountain

Slow City Kyoto

A Minute and 100 Metres
Down the Road

Contact: submissions@kyotojournal.org
 

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Online Special

On January 13, 2013 By

Online Special

Our new website opens up exciting possibilities through the immediacy and expanding potential of digital publishing and multimedia. In addition to posting topical articles as online-only special features, we bring you out-of-the-ordinary videos and occasional podcasts. Our most recent postings appear on this page. For your easy reference, here’s a list that illustrates […]

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APRIL 18-MAY10: Fourteen exhibitions on the theme of “TRIBE,” spread across Kyoto in brilliantly-coordinated venues ranging from a sub-temple of the city’s first Zen monastery to traditional inner-city machiya to a temporary Shigeru Ban cardboard-columned pavilion in front of City Hall to “anti-fashionista” Rei Kawakubo’s local Comme Des Garcons concept store.

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Remembering the 2004 Tsunami

On December 16, 2014 By

By Christopher Wyle
 
“I heard you survived the tsunami a few years back. Is that true?”

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“The sense of liberation among participants is almost palpable, there are no expectations, no ‘shoulds,’ no senses of inferiority, the baseline for everyone is the same.”

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Christmas in Tohoku with OGA for AID

On November 25, 2014 By

Christmas in Tohoku with OGA for AID A long haul to recovery

BY JASON BARTASHIUS with research contributed by JAKE NORTHEY

What one child called a “dark wall” rising from the sea crashed down on Minami-Sanriku, destroying the city hall, and washing away everyone and everything in its path. People’s lives were turned […]

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Peace Engineering

On November 11, 2014 By

Kimberly Rose

Pangaea activities can even help to erase biases inherited by the children from their parents or grandparents.

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Memories have inevitably faded during the 25 years that have passed since the tragic end of the 1989 Tiananmen student protests, and for the younger generation in China, it’s hardly even a blip in the country’s historical flow to present-day prosperity.

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REVIEW BY TED TAYLOR

As I sat down to read On Freedom: Spirit, Art, and State, one of the first thoughts I had was how difficult it is to peg a term as loaded as “Freedom.” At about the same moment as I had this thought, the chorus of the jaunty Calypso song on my stereo sang out, “Always remember somebody suffering more than you.

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POEM BY GREGORY DUNNE
David Jenkins, a longterm resident of Kyoto, translated medieval Japanese poetry (with his co-translator, Yasuhiko Moriguchi) — and made it timeless. He passed away on April 10th, 2000, surrounded by fully-blooming sakura; is still missed by friends and colleagues here at KJ.

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The history of Japanese photography underwent a significant change in the 1930s. The traditional pictorial-influenced movement merged into New Photography (Shinko Shashin)…

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