Currently viewing the tag: "Poetry"

Teresa Mei Chuc reads her poetry. From Remembering Viet Nam, KJ 82

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Better Would Be Ume

On February 3, 2015 By

Come Spring I’ll choose a tree
to fill the emptiness
and celebrate the birds’ return with flowers.

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Poetry and Prose, Mirrors and Distance

 
 
Poems of a Penisist by Mutsuo Takahashi. Translated by Hiroaki Sato.
Twelve Views from the Distance by Mutsuo Takahashi. Translated by Jeffrey Angles.

REVIEW BY GREGORY DUNNE
 
 
he University of Minnesota […]

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Mekong River

On May 7, 2014 By

TERESA MEI CHUC

Today’s flowers let me inside
into their vase-shaped bodies

Today, I swim this river
with its fish and turtles
and crocodiles…

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Ajal

On April 20, 2014 By

BRIAN TURNER

There are ninety-nine special names for God,
my son, and not so long ago I held you
newly born under a crescent moon,
and gave you the name which means servant
of God…

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POEM BY GREGORY DUNNE
David Jenkins, a longterm resident of Kyoto, translated medieval Japanese poetry (with his co-translator, Yasuhiko Moriguchi) — and made it timeless. He passed away on April 10th, 2000, surrounded by fully-blooming sakura; is still missed by friends and colleagues here at KJ.

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The Pilgrim Journey

On February 1, 2014 By

BY GEORGE JISHO ROBERTSON

In 1973 I went looking for a Buddha to come to my, and even maybe our, rescue. I wanted to actually meet the guy, hear his voice…Of course, I didn’t find him. I found me looking for him.

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(Japan) ¥2500(International) ¥3000

Shipping & handling
included
 
Published July 2017, 128pp.
Kyoto Journal
and White Pine Press
 

 
Second Edition (July 2017)

Kyoto: The Forest Within […]

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Japlish Whiplash

On March 24, 2013 By

REVIEWED BY JEFFREY ANGLES

Japlish Whiplash is a book that gleefully transgresses boundaries — the boundaries between the United States and Japan, between English and the Japanese language, between academic poets and slam poets, between “artistic” and “plebian,” between “high” and “low,” and between “avant-garde” and “urban.”

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