Tea & Food

Kyoto has long been a center for the essence of Japanese fare. Reputedly, Kyoto’s kaiseki ryori was the inspiration for the French chefs who created nouvelle cuisine in the 1960s. Traditional restaurants abound, but we know one neo-kaiseki place where not only the menu changes monthly – so does the head chef’s totally unique anima/manga-inspired graphic sculpted/dyed hairstyle.

 

 

 

 

Tea & Food

On July 25, 2011 By

Tea & Food

Kyoto has long been a center for the essence of Japanese fare. Reputedly, Kyoto’s kaiseki ryori was the inspiration for the French chefs who created nouvelle cuisine in the 1960s. Traditional restaurants abound, but we know one neo-kaiseki place where not only the menu changes monthly – so does the head chef’s […]

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KJ 83: FOOD!

On July 7, 2015 By

FOOD!—a delectable feast of articles, essays, interviews, poetry, and fine photography, painstakingly prepared by our all-volunteer international kitchen crew—will be released on August 1st, 2015

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Wisteria was the first intellectual style teahouse, and created a quiet, clean place to focus on drinking tea. Outside the wood and paper walls of the two-story Japanese house was a garden with bamboo and a koi pond.

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The Name Game

On May 13, 2014 By

Winnie Yu

For the Chinese understand that without nature, man is inherently insignificant. It is therefore understandable that of all of the thousands of teas in China, none were specifically named after a person, not even after any of the many emperors who were often responsible for naming them.

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Masala Chai

On May 13, 2014 By

Text and photographs by Matteo Pistono

In India, the distinctive call of “chai, gaurum chai, chai” (tea, hot tea, tea) resonates from the urban alleyways of Delhi and Calcutta, to the dusty villages in Bihar and Gujarat, and from Himalayan outposts to the Kerala waterways.

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Tea Beyond Japan

On May 13, 2014 By

I am not your typical or natural tea student: a left-handed, cross-country skiing, Jewish feminist. Studying chanoyu for the past 24 years has been both challenging and intriguing for all those reasons. I have been fortunate to find a great teacher who can teach me. I have been encouraged by her to make the practice my own within her very formal teaching.

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Much Ado About Matcha

On May 13, 2014 By

If you think that chanoyu, the Japanese tea ritual, is primarily about enjoying the flavor of matcha … I have a bridge to sell you! Let’s call it the ultimate Japanese “urban myth”. Making matcha – mixing of hot water and a tiny bit of carefully selected, hand-picked young green tea leaves in powdered form – is merely the premise for a refined social gathering.

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The Korean Way of Tea

On May 12, 2014 By

Korea has had a “Way” of tea but it hasn’t been widely seen, much less described or studied by foreigners. This new guidebook full of color illustrations, created by Brother Anthony and Hong Kyeong-Hee is a welcome edition to one’s tea or Korean culture library.

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A Taste of Zenbu Zen

On April 17, 2013 By

FOOD
REVIEW BY LAUREN HADLER

In Search of Kyoto’s Epicurean Culture

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The Epic of Tea

On February 19, 2012 By

TEA
BY DANIEL R. KANE

“Why do you study Tea?” The usual answers perhaps are enough: “It is an aesthetic exercise; a Zen discipline; a unique means of social interaction.” Yet, I have wondered if there might be some other attraction to Tea; something not so apparent…

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