Posts by: johneinarsen

Based on my experience the older generation, those who experienced WWII directly, fall into two groups. One is characterized by strong anti-military, anti-war sentiment: “We have to maintain the Peace Constitution; never again such a terrible war.” Others believe that WWII was a kind of defensive war… the U.S. and European countries were colonialist, and Japan liberated the Asian nations.

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The Unyielding

On May 28, 2014 By

Okamoto began to write prose of lyrical and, at times, hyperbolic intensity, exploring modernist concepts of the artist and/or the individual in collision with society, spiritual alienation, and the moral, ethical, and political dilemma of the abandonment of tradition.

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Persona is like a flashcard pastiche, much of it based on interviews and private correspondence fused with the historical events through which Mishima moved. Mishima’s lifelong obsession with death and suicide and his sensational death by seppuku at forty-five, haunts the biography.

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Article 9 can also be seen as a gift to humanity, simply denouncing war. Simply doing that.

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VILHAR’S BOOKS
 

MATSURI: World of Japanese Festivals
Shufunotomo Co., Ltd., Tokyo, 1994.
Currently out of print.
Used copies available online.

 

KYOTO: A Cultural Sojourn
Yohan, 1998.
IBC Publishing, 2013, Tokyo.

 

GRACIOUS GIFTS:
Japan’s […]

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Wisteria was the first intellectual style teahouse, and created a quiet, clean place to focus on drinking tea. Outside the wood and paper walls of the two-story Japanese house was a garden with bamboo and a koi pond.

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The Name Game

On May 13, 2014 By

Winnie Yu

For the Chinese understand that without nature, man is inherently insignificant. It is therefore understandable that of all of the thousands of teas in China, none were specifically named after a person, not even after any of the many emperors who were often responsible for naming them.

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Masala Chai

On May 13, 2014 By

Text and photographs by Matteo Pistono

In India, the distinctive call of “chai, gaurum chai, chai” (tea, hot tea, tea) resonates from the urban alleyways of Delhi and Calcutta, to the dusty villages in Bihar and Gujarat, and from Himalayan outposts to the Kerala waterways.

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DMZ Diary

On May 13, 2014 By

by Lauren W. Deutsch

How does one casually “visit” such an area as a tourist? Should I be afraid of potential for armed attack? Is there a protocol of safe, reverential behavior? Isn’t it more a place of pilgrimage? I had 50 kilometers in Seoul traffic to think about it.

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