Posts by: lucinda

Poetry, Love, Enlightenment

On October 1, 2011 By

POET
BY RASOUL SORKHABI

Eight hundred years ago, in a northeastern town of the Persian kingdom, a boy was born. When he was twelve years old, he chanced to meet the great Sufi master and Persian poet Attar, who told the boy’s father: “The fiery words of this boy will kindle the souls of lovers all over the world.”

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The Hermit Experience

On October 1, 2011 By

BY LAUREN W. DEUTSCH

EDWARD A. BURGER found his teacher, Master Guangkuan, in the Zhongnan Mountains in the winter of 1999. He completed his first documentary, Amongst White Clouds, about Zhongnan Mountain hermits in 2005…

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The Wrong Paradise

On September 28, 2011 By

SHORT STORY
BY RABINDRANATH TAGORE

Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941), the first Asian to win a Nobel Prize, is widely considered the greatest Bengali poet of all time. He is certainly one of the finest writers of the world in the past century….

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Little Soman’s Little War

On September 16, 2011 By

AFGHANISTAN
BY KEITH HARMON SNOW

Dead army tanks are everywhere here. One supposes they are dead. There are dead tanks in villages, sunk in streams, crossing fields, sleeping on hills, burrowing into the wind-swept land like crabs at the beach.

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Gion Geisha

On September 15, 2011 By

INTERVIEW BY IAN PERLMAN

Yoshida Teruko is a former geiko (often called geisha outside of Kyoto). She is the proprietor of a bar in the Gion district whose clientele includes corporate leaders from Kyoto, Tokyo and other countries.

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War, Crisis and News in Korea

On September 11, 2011 By

REVIEW BY ERIC JOHNSTON

After Japan colonized Korea in 1910, the journalistic record would, over the next few decades, be tightly controlled by Japanese censors, further contributing to Korea’s sense of isolation from the outside world. That would begin to change after the Second World War…

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Trajectories of War

On September 11, 2011 By

REVIEW BY KEN RODGERS

Published more than sixty years since the end of World War II, this painstakingly-researched account of the downing of an American B-29 by anti-aircraft fire over Niigata City in July 1945 has a distinctly Rashomon-like quality, incorporating multiple viewpoints, both American and Japanese…

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REVIEW BY VINITA RAMANI MOHAN

How do you deal with trauma until this or that civil society organization and tribunal comes to you with promises to heal your wounds? Mãnoa’s Maps of Reconciliation is a compendium of writings and images that grapple with this very difficult question.

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Tea Tourism and Trade

On September 11, 2011 By

Reviews BY LAUREN W. DEUTSCH

In addition to promoting stunningly beautiful rows of tea bushes and romantic “exotic” peoples, there’s money to be made welcoming eco-tourists to stalk wild tea plants, visit plantations, gardens, processing facilities, markets and auctions.

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